YOU MAY HAVE TO WATCH WHAT YOUR FRUITS AND VEGGIES EAT

YOU MAY HAVE TO WATCH WHAT YOUR FRUITS AND VEGGIES EAT

From  FMS Global News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton Embargoed: 3-Sep-2014                       Citations Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology    Source Newsroom:                     American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

 

Newswise — ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. (September 3, 2014) – People with food allergies always have to watch what they eat. Now, they may have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat, as it seems it is possible to have an allergic reaction to antibiotic residues in food.

An article published in the September issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), examines the case of a 10 year-old girl who had an anaphylactic (severely allergic) reaction after eating blueberry pie. Although she had a medical history of asthma and seasonal allergies, and known anaphylaxis to penicillin and cow’s milk, she was not known to be allergic to any of the ingredients in the pie.

After weeks of testing on both the young girl and a sample of the pie, the article authors decided that what had caused the reaction was a streptomycin-contaminated blueberry. Streptomycin, in addition to being a drug used to fight disease, is also used as a pesticide in fruit, to combat the growth of bacteria, fungi, and algae.

“As far as we know, this is the first report that links an allergic reaction to fruits treated with antibiotic pesticides,” said allergist Anne Des Roches, MD,FRCP, lead study author.

“Certain European countries ban the use of antibiotics for growing foods, but the United States and Canada still allow them for agricultural purposes.”

The authors note that new regulations from the Food and Drug Administration may help to reduce antibiotic contaminants in food, which will help reduce antibiotic resistance and may also help reduce this type of event.

“This is a very rare allergic reaction” said allergist James Sublett, MD, ACAAI president-elect. “Nevertheless, it is something allergists need to be aware of and that emergency room personnel may need to know about in order to help determine where anaphylactic reactions may arise. Anyone who is at risk for a life-threatening allergic reaction should always carry epinephrine. They also need to know how to use their epinephrine in an emergency situation.”

About ACAAI
The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 6,000 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes.

Emergencies – My Comments

This information I have ‘borrowed’ with courtesy and thanks for when it is needed  to help save a life  http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/epipen-helping-hand

PLEASE  make sure you  read the website to be prepared if  a family member carries an Epipen

How to Use the EpiPen
Instructions are written and pictured on each pen. Keep 2 pens available. Read the directions carefully when you pick up your prescription. If your child is old enough to use the EpiPen himself, have him practice using the trainer pen that does not have medicine or a needle. Both of you will know how to use it before there is an emergency.

Pull off the blue safety cap from the pen.
Make a fist around the syringe so the orange tip is pointing down.

CAUTION: DO NOT PUT YOUR THUMB ON THE ORANGE TIP.

If the pen is upside down, you will inject yourself in the finger!
Hold orange tip near outer thigh, swing and press firmly against the outer thigh until you hear it click.

Hold it in the thigh for 10 seconds. It can be given through clothing if necessary.EPIPEN PIC.

Remove EpiPen from the thigh and massage the injection site for 10 seconds. The orange needle cover will now cover the used needle.  Call 911.
Important Points to Remember
Always call 9-1-1 after using epinephrine. The medicine starts to wear off in 20 to 30 minutes and the reaction may come back.

Your child must sit back or lie down after the injection. Repeat the dose in 5 to 10 minutes if your child is not improving. Inhalers, such as albuterol and antihistamines (Benadryl®), are not usually enough to treat severe allergic reactions. They can be given after epinephrine is used if available. Please look a the website for futher information BEFORE it  happens..

http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/epipen-helping-hand

My thanks for the use of the website and my  apologies but my motif was purely to save a life if necessary..

 

EXPERIENCES MAKE YOU HAPPIER THAN POSSESSIONS – BEFORE AND AFTER

From the FMS Global News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton Released: 2-Sep-2014                Citation Psychological Science   Source Newsroom: Cornell University

 

Newswise — To get the most enjoyment out of our dollar, science tells us to focus our discretionary spending on experiences such as travel over material goods. A new Cornell University study shows that the enjoyment we derive from experiential purchases may begin even before we buy.

This research offers important information for individual consumers who are trying to “decide on the right mix of material and experiential consumption for maximizing well-being,” said psychology researcher and study author Thomas Gilovich of Cornell University.

Previously, Gilovich and colleagues had found that people get more retrospective enjoyment and satisfaction from their experiential purchases than from their material purchases. And other research has shown that people often hold off on experiences so that they can savor the thought of eventually having them.

Gilovich and co-authors Amit Kumar of Cornell University and Matthew Killingsworth of University of California, San Francisco wanted to bring these lines of research together and investigate whether the enjoyment we get from the anticipation of a purchase depends on what we are buying.

The researchers discovered that people thinking about impending experiential purchases, such as ski passes or concert tickets, have higher levels of happiness than those who anticipate spending money on things.

In addition, researchers found the act of actually waiting in line to make a purchase may be more pleasant for those intending to spend money on an experience. In one, an analysis of newspaper accounts of crowds of people waiting in line, found that those waiting to purchase an experience were in better moods and were better behaved than those waiting to purchase material goods.

“You sometimes hear stories about people rioting, smashing windows, pepper-spraying one another, or otherwise treating others badly when they have to wait,” said Kumar.

“Our work shows that this kind of behavior is much more likely in instances where people are waiting to acquire a possession than when they are waiting for tickets to a performance or to taste the offerings at their city’s newest food truck.”

The researchers speculate that there may be several factors that could explain these findings. People may think about future experiences in more abstract ways that can make them seem more significant and more gratifying, for example. It is also possible that waiting for an experience induces less competition than waiting for material goods. Finally, anticipating experiences may confer greater social benefits, making people feel more connected and happier overall.

The findings have clear implications for individual consumers, but they could also inform the way money is spent on a much broader scale:

“Our research is also important to society because it suggests that overall well-being can be advanced by providing an infrastructure that affords experiences – such as parks, trails, beaches – as much as it does material consumption,” says Gilovich.

The findings were published in Psychological Science and supported by the National Science Foundation and by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation through the Greater Good Science Center.

TRAIN YOUR HEART TO PROTECT YOUR MIND

From the FMS Global News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton Released: 25-Aug-2014                   Citations Neurobiology of Aging on August 20, 2014 .Source: Universite de Montreal

 

Newswise — Exercising to improve our cardiovascular strength may protect us from cognitive impairment as we age, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut universitaire de gératrie de Montréal Research Centre.

“Our body’s arteries stiffen with age, and the vessel hardening is believed to begin in the aorta, the main vessel coming out of the heart, before reaching the brain. Indeed, the hardening may contribute to cognitive changes that occur during a similar time frame,” explained Claudine Gauthier, first author of the study.

“We found that older adults whose aortas were in a better condition and who had greater aerobic fitness performed better on a cognitive test. We therefore think that the preservation of vessel elasticity may be one of the mechanisms that enables exercise to slow cognitive aging.”

The researchers worked with 31 young people between the ages of 18 and 30 and 54 older participants aged between 55 and 75. This enabled the team to compare the older participants within their peer group and against the younger group who obviously have not begun the aging processes in question. None of the participants had physical or mental health issues that might influence the study outcome.

Their fitness was tested by exhausting the participants on a workout machine and determining their maximum oxygen intake over a 30 second period. Their cognitive abilities were assessed with the Stroop task.

The Stroop task is a scientifically validated test that involves asking someone to identify the ink colour of a colour word that is printed in a different colour (e.g. the word red could be printed in blue ink and the correct answer would be blue). A person who is able to correctly name the colour of the word without being distracted by the reflex to read it has greater cognitive agility.

The participants undertook three MRI scans: one to evaluate the blood flow to the brain, one to measure their brain activity as they performed the Stroop task, and one to actually look at the physical state of their aorta. The researchers were interested in the brain’s blood flow, as poorer cardiovascular health is associated with a faster pulse wave,at each heartbeat which in turn could cause damage to the brain’s smaller blood vessels.

“This is first study to use MRI to examine participants in this way,” Gauthier said.

“It enabled us to find even subtle effects in this healthy population, which suggests that other researchers could adapt our test to study vascular-cognitive associations within less healthy and clinical populations.”

The results demonstrated age-related declines in executive function, aortic elasticity and cardiorespiratory fitness, a link between vascular health and brain function, and a positive association between aerobic fitness and brain function.

“The link between fitness and brain function may be mediated through preserved cerebrovascular reactivity in periventricular watershed areas that are also associated with cardiorespiratory fitness,” Gauthier said.

“Although the impact of fitness on cerebral vasculature may however involve other, more complex mechanisms, overall these results support the hypothesis that lifestyle helps maintain the elasticity of arteries, thereby preventing downstream cerebrovascular damage and resulting in preserved cognitive abilities in later life.”

About this study
This work was supported by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (MOP 84378, Banting and Best Scholarship held by CJG, Canadian Research Chair to LB), the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (Leaders Opportunity Fund 17380), the Ministère du développement économique, de l’innovation et de l’exportation (PSR-SIIRI-239) and the Canadian National Sciences and Engineering Research Council (R0018142). The findings were published in Neurobiology of Aging on August 20, 2014. The University of Montreal is officially known as Université de Montréal.

Back tomorrow, Jeanne

 

 

 

 

 

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