BEWARE OF COSMETIC STEM CELLS PROCEDURES,

BEWARE OF CLAIMS ABOUT COSMETIC STEM CELLS PROCEDURES, SAYS REVIEW IN PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

From the FMS Global News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton -Source : Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins – Citations Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

 

Newswise — July 29, 2014 – Advertising claims for cosmetic procedures using stem cells are running far ahead of the scientific evidence for safety and effectiveness, according to a review in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

“Stem cells offer tremendous potential, but the marketplace is saturated with unsubstantiated and sometimes fraudulent claims that may place patients at risk,” write Dr Michael T. Longaker of Stanford University Medical Center and colleagues.

‘Worrying advertisements’ for cosmetic stem cell procedures
Dr Longaker and coauthors raise concerns about the unregulated use of stem cells for unproven indications—including cosmetic procedures. While stem cell therapy “remains in its infancy,” they write, “there are a growing number of cosmetic practitioners that are advertising minimally invasive, stem cell-based rejuvenation procedures.”

The article was prompted by “worrying advertisements” claiming benefits of stem cell procedures for facelifts, breast augmentation—even “stem cell vaginal rejuvenation.” These ads claim benefits from procedures that have not undergone rigorous scientific evaluation—including potential risks related to stem cell and tissue processing and the effects of aging on stem cells.

To gain insight into these claims, Dr Longaker and coauthors performed a Google search for cosmetic stem cell treatments, the most common of which was “stem cell facelifts.” Most procedures used “stem cells” isolated from fat. However, the websites provided little information on the quality of the stem cells used.

Without advanced cell-sorting procedures, these products used in these procedures likely contain many other types of cells besides fat-derived stem cells. Many clinics also offered plasma-rich platelet protein treatments, which they inaccurately marketed as stem cell therapy.

Despite evidence that is “minimal at best,” advertisers are also claiming that their stem cell treatments have “anti-aging effects.” The authors note that procedures marketed as “stem cell facelifts” are often just “lipofilling” procedures—an established fat injection technique with no prolonged anti-aging effect.

Call for plastic surgery to lead in evaluating cosmetic uses of stem cells
To date, just one stem cell procedure for cosmetic purpose has received FDA approval, after extensive evaluation. That product, designed to treat fine facial wrinkles, is undergoing extensive post-approval surveillance. Of more than 100 clinical trials being performed to evaluate fat-derived stem cells, only a handful are focusing on cosmetic treatments.

Stem cells certainly have a role to play in regenerative medicine and cosmetic surgery. The authors note that the ASPS and other specialty groups have formed task forces to develop position statements based on the best available data for procedures using fat-derived stem cells.

“With plastic surgeons at the forefront of stem cell-based regenerative medicine, it is critically important that we provide an example of a rigorous approach to research, data collection, and advertising of stem cell therapies,” Dr Longaker and coauthors conclude. “Stem cells offer tremendous potential for cosmetic applications, but we must be vigilant to avoid unscientific claims which may threaten this nascent field.”

About Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
For more than 60 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery  has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair, and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues.

About ASPS
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the world’s largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons. Representing more than 7,000 Member Surgeons, the Society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the Society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. ASPS advances quality care to plastic surgery patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

About Wolters Kluwer Health
Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries worldwide, clinicians rely on Wolters Kluwer Health’s market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions throughout their professional careers from training to research to practice. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2013 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.7 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America.

 

WANT TO LIVE LONGER? GO FOR A RUN, SAYS IOWA STATE RESEARCHER

From the FMS Global News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton Released: 29-Jul-2014 1
Source Newsroom: Iowa State University –Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Newswise — AMES, Iowa – Need an incentive to lace up your shoes and go for a run? A new Iowa State University study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found running for just five or 10 minutes a day can significantly reduce your risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

You do not have to run marathons to benefit from running. A new Iowa State University study found running just five to 10 minutes a day can reduce your risk of death from heart disease or stroke.

DC (Duck-chul) Lee, lead author of the study and an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State, says runners were 45 percent less likely to die from heart disease or stroke than non-runners. Researchers followed more than 55,000 adults for 15 years to gauge the benefits of running. Lee says runners reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease regardless of distance, duration and speed.

“Most people say they do not have time to exercise or to increase their physical activity, but I think most everyone can find five to 10 minutes per day to run for the health benefits,” Lee said.

“I hope more people will be motivated by this study and hope that they can start running and continue to run.”

Researchers from the University of South Carolina, the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute in New Orleans, and Louisiana State University were part of the study.

LEISURE-TIME RUNNING REDUCES ALL-CAUSE AND CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY RISK

Duck-chul Lee, PhD; Russell R. Pate, PhD; Carl J. Lavie, MD; Xuemei Sui, MD, PhD; Timothy S. Church, MD, PhD§; Steven N. Blair, PED

Abstract

Background  Although running is a popular leisure-time physical activity, little is known about the long-term effects of running on mortality. The dose-response relations between running, as well as the change in running behaviors over time, and mortality remain uncertain.

Objectives  We examined the associations of running with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risks in 55,137 adults, 18 to 100 years of age (mean age 44 years).

Methods  Running was assessed on a medical history questionnaire by leisure-time activity.

Results  During a mean follow-up of 15 years, 3,413 all-cause and 1,217 cardiovascular deaths occurred. Approximately 24% of adults participated in running in this population. Compared with nonrunners, runners had 30% and 45% lower adjusted risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, with a 3-year life expectancy benefit. In dose-response analyses, the mortality benefits in runners were similar across quintiles of running time, distance, frequency, amount, and speed, compared with nonrunners. Weekly running even <51 min, <6 miles, 1 to 2 times, <506 metabolic equivalent-minutes, or <6 miles/h was sufficient to reduce risk of mortality, compared with not running. In the analyses of change in running behaviors and mortality, persistent runners had the most significant benefits, with 29% and 50% lower risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, compared with never-runners.

Conclusions  Running, even 5 to 10 min/day and at slow speeds <6 miles/h, is associated with markedly reduced risks of death from all causes and cardiovascular disease. This study may motivate healthy but sedentary individuals to begin and continue running for substantial and attainable mortality benefits.

Central Illustration

Leisure-Time Running Reduced All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality Risk

Hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by running characteristic (weekly running time, distance, frequency, total amount, and speed). Participants were classified into 6 groups: nonrunners (reference group) and 5 quintiles of each running characteristic. All HRs were adjusted for baseline age (years), sex, examination year, smoking status (never, former, or current), alcohol consumption (heavy drinker or not), other physical activities except running (0, 1 to 499, or ≥500 MET-minutes/week), and parental history of cardiovascular disease (yes or no). All p values for HRs across running characteristics were <0.05 for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality except for running frequency of ≥6 times/week (p = 0.11) and speed of <6.0 miles/h (p = 0.10) for cardiovascular mortality.

Perspectives

COMPETENCY IN MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE: Leisure-time running, even at low intensity or pace, reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality independently of sex, age, body mass index, health behavior, and medical conditions. Reduction in mortality is related to continued running activity over time, and running is as important as such other prognostic variables like smoking, obesity, or hypertension.

COMPETENCY IN INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Healthcare providers should explain to patients the significant mortality benefits of running even as little as 5 to 10 min daily. Try to motivate patients to start running and to continue running as an attainable health goal.

TRANSLATIONAL OUTLOOK: Further research is needed to determine whether there is an upper limit to the amount of vigorous physical activity, beyond which additional exercise provides no further mortality reduction.

 

 

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